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  • Alabê Ketujazz

    From the press release on their website:
    “Alabê presents the traditional percussion of the Afro-Brazilian religion known as Candomblé in a jazz context. The compositions are dialogues between the percussion of the Ketu nation and the saxophone, like the Rum (the drum that leads the ceremony) converses with the Orisha (a spirit embodied by a person in trance).

    Brazilian music has its roots in the African rhythms which were played in places of worship of the Candomblé. Around the world, African musical heritage has spread giving birth to Blues, Jazz, Rumba, Salsa and Samba.

    The riches of African percussion are immense. This knowledge is transmitted from master to apprentice in ritual spaces and ceremonies. Each sacred drummer, called an Ogan, possesses a piece of that knowledge. In this oral tradition, where there is no formal study, it is rare for outsiders to encounter archives of these musical treasures. Many famous Brazilian percussionists are inspired by this tradition, but it is very rare to encounter it in its original form outside of the Candomblé.

    Bringing this traditional knowledge in a contemporary setting and making it accessible to a larger public is a way to contribute to the preservation and the valorisation of this intangible culture.

    The group was founded by Antoine Olivier, a French percussionist living in Rio de Janeiro who performs as​ an Ogan in the Candomblé, and Brazilian saxophonist Glaucus Linx (Isaac Hayes, Salif Keita, Elza Soares, Carlinhos Brown…). The band also features the Grand Master of the Candomblé drums : Dofono de Omolu and percussionists Tiago Magalhães e Gabriel Guenther.

    The sacred rhythms of the Candomblé offer their power and complexity in a modern context: this is Alabê Ketujazz. Four percussionists and a saxophonist explore new musical landscapes with original compositions and classics by the likes of Baden Powell.”


  • Bondoro: New MOZ Dance & Beats

    Bondoro is a quite new dance and music style from Beira, Mozambique’s second largest city in the central part of the country. In several aspects it is similar to South African Kwaito and Kuduro from Angola. Bondoro is a slang word that means plaster and that name was given to the dance because of the first moves where the dancer seems to have a plaster on one of his extremities.

    Download some tunes here.


  • STANK

    STANK is a duo formed by DJ Dolores and Yuri Queiroga. Live they value improvisation, mixing original tracks with records, samples, guitar and gadgets leading to a rare case of combination of experimentation and full dancefloor.
    The EP is a compilation of remixes done for artists of different origin, from Maga Bo to the traditional group Coco Raízes de Arcoverde passing by Eddie, China, Naurêa and an own track.

    Get the EP for free here or listen to some of the tracks:


  • Sigauque Project

    From their website:

    “The music of Maputo-based Sigauque Project takes most audiences by surprise. With musical influences spanning across the continent – from a new take on Marrabenta to Senegalese Mbalak and Nigerian Afro Beat, with some smooth sounding jazz thrown in the mix, the band is a pan-African musical journey on the Mozambique stage.

    While other musicians lean more and more towards fewer instruments and more techno beats, this band’s two singers, full horn section, throbbing bass, and rhythmic percussion creates an attention grabbing wall of fresh sounds. Listen closely, and you’ll hear that in addition to the local Portuguese, Changaan, and Sena lyrics, the vocalists sing in English, French, Swahili, and Zulu.

    The band is the creation of Canadian-born Daniel Walter, a radio producer and musician who heads up a media company specialising in communication for social change, CMFD (Community Media for Development) Productions. What most of the audience probably don’t realise is that most of the tunes played by Sigauque Project were originally created and recorded by CMFD Productions as part of music and radio projects broadcast across Africa – this music has a message.

    Some songs were created during projects specifically using music to speak out about a message For example, Musicians Against Xenophobia, which includes the songs Sigaouke and Sinjengomfula, brought musicians from Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa together to produce four songs about xenophobia and discrimination.

    Other songs were produced as theme music to accompany serial radio dramas. Crossroads, Caminhos Cruzados, and Pistes Croissees, are regional variations to music for a radio drama of the same names, the story an old, corrupt police chief and a market woman who switch bodies, for a hilarious insight in how men and women experience life differently in Africa. “Bravos do Zambeze,” originally recorded with Isaú Meneses, also the theme song for a drama of the same name, is a mellow tune that warns of being prepared for impending floods.”


  • Bemba Trio

    Formed by Russo Passapusso, Fael 1st and DJ Root. BEMBA TRIO incorporates the diversity and cultural authenticity of the peripheral culture of Bahia state in its melodies, performances and language. The vocalists emphasize on a spoken style valuing stories, regional accents and words in their lyrics and interpretations.
    The Selector, responsible for the beats and instrumental basis, uses tones and effects known from the dynamics of sound systems.
    The research mixes a wide range of global and local rhythms like Samba Reggae, Samba chula, Ragga, Repente, Miami Bass among other rhythms of the periphery.

    You can download some tunes on their Soundcloud page: